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Allegory And Violence

Allegory And Violence
Author: Gordon Teskey
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801429958
Size: 46.33 MB
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The only form of monumental artistic expression practiced from antiquity to the Enlightenment, allegory evolved to its fullest complexity in Dante's Commedia and Spenser's Faerie Queene. Drawing on a wide range of literary, visual, and critical works in the European tradition, Gordon Teskey provides both a literary history of allegory and a theoretical account of the genre which confronts fundamental questions about the violence inherent in cultural forms. Approaching allegory as the site of intense ideological struggle, Teskey argues that the desire to raise temporal experience to ever higher levels of abstraction cannot be realized fully but rather creates a "rift" that allegory attempts to conceal. After examining the emergence of allegorical violence from the gendered metaphors of classical idealism, Teskey describes its amplification when an essentially theological form of expression was politicized in the Renaissance by the introduction of the classical gods, a process leading to the replacement of allegory by political satire and cartoons. He explores the relationship between rhetorical voice and forms of indirect speech (such as irony) and investigates the corporeal emblematics of violence in authors as different as Machiavelli and Yeats. He considers the large organizing theories of culture, particularly those of Eliot and Frye, which take the place in the modern world of earlier allegorical visions. Concluding with a discussion of the Mutabilitie Cantos, Teskey describes Spenser's metaphysical allegory, which is deconstructed by its own invocation of genealogical struggle, as a prophetic vision and a form of warning.
Allegory and Violence
Language: en
Pages: 195
Authors: Gordon Teskey
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Cornell University Press
The only form of monumental artistic expression practiced from antiquity to the Enlightenment, allegory evolved to its fullest complexity in Dante's Commedia and Spenser's Faerie Queene. Drawing on a wide range of literary, visual, and critical works in the European tradition, Gordon Teskey provides both a literary history of allegory and a theoretical account of the genre which confronts fundamental questions about the violence inherent in cultural forms. Approaching allegory as the site of intense ideological struggle, Teskey argues that the desire to raise temporal experience to ever higher levels of abstraction cannot be realized fully but rather creates a "rift" that allegory attempts to conceal. After examining the emergence of allegorical violence from the gendered metaphors of classical idealism, Teskey describes its amplification when an essentially theological form of expression was politicized in the Renaissance by the introduction of the classical gods, a process leading to the replacement of allegory by political satire and cartoons. He explores the relationship between rhetorical voice and forms of indirect speech (such as irony) and investigates the corporeal emblematics of violence in authors as different as Machiavelli and Yeats. He considers the large organizing theories of culture, particularly those of Eliot and Frye,
Allegories of Violence
Language: en
Pages: 112
Authors: Lidia Yuknavitch
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-12-16 - Publisher: Routledge
Allegories of Violence demilitarizes the concept of war and asks what would happen if we understood war as discursive via late 20th Century novels of war.
Allegories of War
Language: en
Pages: 226
Authors: John P. Hermann
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1989 - Publisher:
Explores the intersection of spirituality and violence in Old English poetry using contemporary approaches
Thinking Allegory Otherwise
Language: en
Pages: 276
Authors: Brenda Machosky
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Stanford University Press
"Thinking Allegory Otherwise is a unique collection of essays by allegory specialists and other scholars who engage allegory in exciting new ways." "Not limited to an examination of literary texts and works of art, the essays focus on a wide range of topics, including architecture, philosophy, theater, science, and law. Indeed, all language is allegorical. This collection proves the truth of this statement, but more importantly, it shows the consequences of it. To think allegory otherwise is to think otherwise-forcing us to rethink not only the idea of allegory itself, but also the law and its execution, the literality offigurative abstraction, and the figurations upon which even hard science depends." --Book Jacket.
Structures of Appearing:Allegory and the Work of Literature
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: Brenda Machosky
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
Structures of Appearing: Allegory and the Work of Literature is an interdisciplinary study that revises the history of allegory through a phenomenological approach. The book also takes on the history of aesthetics as an ideology that has long subjugated literature (and art generally) to criteria of judgment that are philosophical rather than literary.
Allegory and Enchantment
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Jason Crawford
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-01-19 - Publisher: Oxford University Press
What is modernity? Where are modernitys points of origin? Where are its boundaries? And what lies beyond those boundaries? Allegory and Enchantment explores these broad questions by considering the work of English writers at the threshold of modernity, and by considering,in particular, the cultural forms these writers want to leave behind. From the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries, many English writers fashion themselves as engaged in breaking away from an array of old idols: magic, superstition, tradition, the sacramental, the medieval. Many of these writers persistently use metaphors of disenchantment, of awakening from a broken spell, to describe their self-consciously modern orientation toward a medieval past. And many of them associate that repudiated past with the dynamics and conventions of allegory. In the hands of the major English practitioners of allegorical narrativeWilliam Langland, John Skelton, Edmund Spenser, and John Bunyanallegory shows signs of strain and disintegration. The work of these writers seems to suggest a story of modern emergence in which medieval allegory, with its search for divine order in the material world, breaks down under the pressure of modern disenchantment. But these four early modern writers also make possible other understandings of modernity. Each of them turns to allegory
Allegory and Sexual Ethics in the High Middle Ages
Language: en
Pages: 218
Authors: N. Guynn
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-03-05 - Publisher: Springer
Guynn offers an innovative new approach to the ethical, cultural, and ideological analysis of medieval allegory. Working between poststructuralism and historical materialism, he considers both the playfulness of allegory and its disciplinary force.
Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism
Language: en
Pages: 284
Authors: Robert E. Stillman
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-22 - Publisher: Routledge
Celebrations of literary fictions as autonomous worlds appeared first in the Renaissance and were occasioned, paradoxically, by their power to remedy the ills of history. Robert E. Stillman explores this paradox in relation to Philip Sidney's Defence of Poesy, the first Renaissance text to argue for the preeminence of poetry as an autonomous form of knowledge in the public domain. Offering a fresh interpretation of Sidney's celebration of fiction-making, Stillman locates the origins of his poetics inside a neglected historical community: the intellectual elite associated with Philip Melanchthon (leader of the German Reformation after Luther), the so-called Philippists. As a challenge to traditional Anglo-centric scholarship, his study demonstrates how Sidney's education by Continental Philippists enabled him to dignify fiction-making as a compelling form of public discourse-compelling because of its promotion of powerful new concepts about reading and writing, its ecumenical piety, and its political ambition to secure through natural law (from universal 'Ideas') freedom from the tyranny of confessional warfare. Intellectually ambitious and wide-ranging, this study draws together various elements of contemporary scholarship in literary, religious, and political history in order to afford a broader understanding of the Defence and the cultural context inside which Sidney produced both his poetry
The Violence of Modernity
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Debarati Sanyal
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-03-03 - Publisher: JHU Press
The result is a study that underscores how Baudelaire's legacy continues to energize literary engagements with the violence of modernity.
Sovereignty and Experience
Language: en
Pages: 169
Authors: Jill Harnesberger
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009 - Publisher: John Donald
By dismantling misconceptions about experience, allegory, and storytelling, my book on Walter Benjamin and Witold Gombrowicz reveals that in the decline of the storyteller the allegorist is the new storyteller. Consequently, the preconceived notions that separate storytelling from allegory should be diminished. The allegorist, whose acts of redemptive rescue forge constellations between elements of the past unknown and unexperienced by anyone in the?present,? finds common ground with the storyteller through a necessary violence, Benjamin's model of allegory - the angel of history. Benjamin's Trauerspiel and Baudelaire studies create a redemptive model for experience - allegory. Moreover, allegory's role in salvaging experience finds its counterpart in another violent model of interruption: Witold Gombrowicz's interhuman church. What allegory salvages in history and inexperience, the interhuman church forms amidst the ruins of language: the inauthentic "sovereign" self.