K D Ushinskii PDF Books

Download K D Ushinskii PDF books. Access full book title Russian And Soviet Education 1731 1989 by John T. Zepper, the book also available in format PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format, to read online books or download K D Ushinskii full books, Click Get Books for free access, and save it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Russian And Soviet Education 1731 1989

K D Ushinskii
Author: John T. Zepper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135838259
Size: 56.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1127
Get Books

First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Russian and Soviet Education 1731-1989
Language: en
Pages: 560
Authors: John T. Zepper, William W. Brickman
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-02-04 - Publisher: Routledge
First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Inner Speech and Thought
Language: en
Pages: 284
Authors: A. Sokolov
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-12-06 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
electrical activity during thinking, both with and without verbalization and the use of language. Although seemingly simple, these experiments tackle a very complex subject with which psychologists, linguists, and others are only beginning to come to grips. Sokolov and his group have succeeded admirably in splitting the subject apart by driving in the wedges of objective measurement and unique experimental formulations. Chapter IX dips into the neurology and neurophysiology of motor speech and its feedback mechanisms and the dynamic localization and organization of the cerebral mechanisms responsible for symbolic formulation of speech and thought. The bibliography brings together a considerable number of Russian publications on this subject, as well as some of the pertinent American and European literature. This book is a welcome addition to an important field. Donald B. Lindsley Professor, Departments of Psychology, Physiology, and Psychiatry, and Member of the Brain Research Institute, of California, Los Angeles University Contents Introduction .......................................... . Part One GENERAL PROBLEMS OF STUDY Chapter I Theories of the Interrelation of Speech and Thought ............... 11 Chapter II The Problem of Inner Speech in Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 . . .
Small Comrades
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Lisa A. Kirschenbaum
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-09-13 - Publisher: Routledge
Small Comrades is a fascinating examination of Soviet conceptions of childhood and the resulting policies directed toward children. Working on the assumption that cultural representations and self-representations are not entirely separable, this book probes how the Soviet regime's representations structured teachers' observations of their pupils and often adults' recollections of their childhood. The book draws on work that has been done on Soviet schooling, and focuses specifically on the development of curricula and institutions, but it also examines the wider context of the relationship between the family and the state, and to the Bolshevik vision of the "children of October"
A History of Education in Modern Russia
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Wayne Dowler
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-08-12 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
A History of Education in Modern Russia is the first book to trace the significance of education in Russia from Peter the Great's reign all the way through to Vladimir Putin and the present day. Individual chapters open with an overview of the political, social, diplomatic and cultural environment of the period in order to orient the reader. Dowler then goes on to analyse the aims of education initiatives in each era before considering the ways in which Russians experienced education, both as students and as teachers. Each chapter concludes with an assessment of the outcomes and consequences of education policies in the period, both the successes and failures as well as the impact of education on the cultural, social, economic and ultimately political environments. The chronologically arranged book also traces and then summarises underlying key themes like the tension between an open system of education and an estate-based system; the push and pull between utility and the broader goal of human development; and the effects of centralized, authoritarian control that for much of the period limited local initiative and starved the regions of adequate resources.
Problems of the Psychology of Memory
Language: en
Pages: 338
Authors: A. Smirnov
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-29 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
Contrary to popular opinion, contemporary psychology in the USSR is far from being monolithic. It is true that the development of Soviet psychology does have characteristic features which distinguish it from the development of Western (and particularly Anglo-American) psychology. Perhaps the most distinguishing features of Soviet psychology are represented by the pre dominance of the historical-evolutionary approach and the emphasis on integrative physiological mechanisms underlying behavior. The development of Soviet psychological thinking can also be characterized as having been free of the fruitless discussions of mind-body dualism and of dominance by rat-and-pigeon-centered behaviorism. Soviet psychology had the benefit of a rich inheritance from the Sech that laid the foundation for modern psycho enov-Botkin-Pavlov school biology and biological psychiatry. Unfortunately, the politically engendered omnipresent dogmatism during the Lysenko-Stalin era of obscurantism tended to pervert this rich scientific heritage and hindered the development of a diversity of concepts and methods in the behavioral and biological sciences.
Women's Struggle for Higher Education in Russia, 1855-1900
Language: en
Pages: 149
Authors: Christine Johanson
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 1987 - Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
Women in nineteenth-century Russia had greater access to medical and higher education than any of their contemporaries in Europe. Women's Struggle for Higher Education in Russia explores the remarkable expansion and upgrading of women's education during the turbulent decades following the Crimean War.
Window on the East
Language: en
Pages: 408
Authors: Robert Geraci
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-10-18 - Publisher: Cornell University Press
Robert Geraci presents an exceptionally original account of both the politics and the lived experience of diversity in a society whose ethnic complexity has long been downplayed. For centuries, Russians have defined their country as both a multinational empire and a homogeneous nation-state in the making, and have alternately embraced and repudiated the East or Asia as fundamental to Russia's identity. The author argues that the city of Kazan, in the middle Volga region, was the chief nineteenth-century site for mediating this troubled and paradoxical relationship with the East, much as St. Petersburg had served as Russia's window on Europe a century earlier. He shows how Russians sought through science, religion, pedagogy, and politics to understand and promote the Russification of ethnic minorities in the East, as well as to define themselves. Vivid in narrative detail, meticulously argued, and peopled by a colorful cast including missionaries, bishops, peasants, mullahs, professors, teachers, students, linguists, orientalists, archeologists, and state officials, Window on the East uses previously untapped archival and published materials to describe the creation (sometimes intentional, sometimes unintentional) of intermediate and new forms of Russianness.
Classroom and Empire
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Wayne Dowler
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001 - Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
The central challenge to imperial powers entering the modern era was the schooling of their peoples. How could they insure the literacy that modernity required without providing a foundation for nationalism among the colonised? In Russia's eastern empire in the late nineteenth century, Orthodox Christianity vied with Islam for people's souls; Russian language competed with Tatar and local vernaculars in market squares, peasant cottages, and schoolrooms; Arabic and Cyrillic alphabets clashed in school textbooks; and western secularism undermined traditional religious authority among both Muslim and Orthodox faithful. Russian nationalism peaked in the early twentieth century and public support for policies of the russification of non-Russian minorities increased. The inevitable clash with local languages shook the stability of the empire. Classroom and Empire tells the story of the politics of alphabets, languages, and schooling in the eastern empire of Russia from 1860 to 1917. Wayne Dowler presents an intriguing cast of characters, including Nikolai Il'minskii, whose method of schooling non-Russian children lay at the heart of nationalist controversy; Ismail Bey Gaspirali, whose new method schools attempted to reconcile Islam with modern secular philosophy and science; Konstantin Pobedonostsev, procurator of the Holy Synod and minence grise of the reigns of Alexander III
Arkhiv K. D. Ushinskii
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Wayne Dowler
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 1959 - Publisher:
Books about Arkhiv K. D. Ushinskii
The Development of a Russian Legal Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 360
Authors: Richard S. Wortman
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-03-15 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Until the nineteenth century, the Russian legal system was subject to an administrative hierarchy headed by the tsar, and the courts were expected to enforce, not interpret the law. Richard S. Wortman here traces the first professional class of legal experts who emerged during the reign of Nicholas I (1826 – 56) and who began to view the law as a uniquely modern and independent source of authority. Discussing how new legal institutions fit into the traditional system of tsarist rule, Wortman analyzes how conflict arose from the same intellectual processes that produced legal reform. He ultimately demonstrates how the stage was set for later events, as the autocracy and judiciary pursued contradictory—and mutually destructive—goals.