Lucian Dialogues Of The Dead Dialogues Of The Sea Gods Dialogues Of The Gods Dialogues Of The Courtesans PDF Books

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Lucian Dialogues Of The Dead Dialogues Of The Sea Gods Dialogues Of The Gods Dialogues Of The Courtesans

Lucian Dialogues Of The Dead Dialogues Of The Sea Gods Dialogues Of The Gods Dialogues Of The Courtesans
Author: Lucian (of Samosata)
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LUCIAN (c. 120-190 A.D.) the satirist from Samosata on the Euphrates, started as an apprentice sculptor, turned to rhetoric and visited Italy and Gaul as a successful travelling lecturer, before settling in Athens and developing his original brand of satire. Late in life he fell on hard times and accepted an official post in Egypt. Although notable for the Attic purity and elegance of his Greek and his literary versatility, Lucian is chiefly famed for the dialogues in which he satirises human folly, superstition and hypocrisy. His aim was to amuse rather than to instruct. Among his best works are A True Story (the tallest of tall stories about a voyage to the moon), Dialogues of the Gods (a 'reductio ad absurdum' of traditional mythology), Dialogues of the Dead (on the vanity of human wishes), Philosophies for Sale (great philosophers of the past are auctioned off as slaves), The Fisherman (the degeneracy of modern philosophers), The Carousal (philosophers misbehave at a party), Timon (the problems of being rich), Twice accused (Lucian's defence of his literary career) and (if by Lucian) The ass (the amusing adventures of a man who turned into an ass).
Lucian: Dialogues of the dead. Dialogues of the sea-gods. Dialogues of the gods. Dialogues of the courtesans
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Lucian (of Samosata)
Categories: Satire, Greek
Type: BOOK - Published: 1913 - Publisher:
LUCIAN (c. 120-190 A.D.) the satirist from Samosata on the Euphrates, started as an apprentice sculptor, turned to rhetoric and visited Italy and Gaul as a successful travelling lecturer, before settling in Athens and developing his original brand of satire. Late in life he fell on hard times and accepted an official post in Egypt. Although notable for the Attic purity and elegance of his Greek and his literary versatility, Lucian is chiefly famed for the dialogues in which he satirises human folly, superstition and hypocrisy. His aim was to amuse rather than to instruct. Among his best works are A True Story (the tallest of tall stories about a voyage to the moon), Dialogues of the Gods (a 'reductio ad absurdum' of traditional mythology), Dialogues of the Dead (on the vanity of human wishes), Philosophies for Sale (great philosophers of the past are auctioned off as slaves), The Fisherman (the degeneracy of modern philosophers), The Carousal (philosophers misbehave at a party), Timon (the problems of being rich), Twice accused (Lucian's defence of his literary career) and (if by Lucian) The ass (the amusing adventures of a man who turned into an ass).
Lucian: Dialogues of the dead. Dialogues of the sea-gods. Dialogues of the gods. Dialogues of the courtesans
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Lucian (of Samosata.)
Categories: Satire, Greek
Type: BOOK - Published: 1913 - Publisher:
Books about Lucian: Dialogues of the dead. Dialogues of the sea-gods. Dialogues of the gods. Dialogues of the courtesans
Lucian: List of Lucians works Preface Dialogues of the dead Dialogues of the sea gods Dialogues of the gods Dialogues of the courtesans Index
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Lucian (of Samosata.)
Categories: Satire, Greek
Type: BOOK - Published: 1913 - Publisher:
LUCIAN (c. 120-190 A.D.) the satirist from Samosata on the Euphrates, started as an apprentice sculptor, turned to rhetoric and visited Italy and Gaul as a successful travelling lecturer, before settling in Athens and developing his original brand of satire. Late in life he fell on hard times and accepted an official post in Egypt. Although notable for the Attic purity and elegance of his Greek and his literary versatility, Lucian is chiefly famed for the dialogues in which he satirises human folly, superstition and hypocrisy. His aim was to amuse rather than to instruct. Among his best works are A True Story (the tallest of tall stories about a voyage to the moon), Dialogues of the Gods (a 'reductio ad absurdum' of traditional mythology), Dialogues of the Dead (on the vanity of human wishes), Philosophies for Sale (great philosophers of the past are auctioned off as slaves), The Fisherman (the degeneracy of modern philosophers), The Carousal (philosophers misbehave at a party), Timon (the problems of being rich), Twice accused (Lucian's defence of his literary career) and (if by Lucian) The ass (the amusing adventures of a man who turned into an ass).
Lucian's Dialogues, Namely the Dialogues of the Gods, of the Sea-Gods, and of the Dead, Etc
Language: en
Pages: 315
Authors: Lucian (of Samosata.)
Categories: Satire, Greek
Type: BOOK - Published: 1888 - Publisher:
Books about Lucian's Dialogues, Namely the Dialogues of the Gods, of the Sea-Gods, and of the Dead, Etc
The Reception of the Homeric Hymns
Language: en
Pages: 400
Authors: Athanassios Vergados, Andreas Schwab
Categories: Satire, Greek
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-01-24 - Publisher: Oxford University Press
The Reception of the Homeric Hymns is a collection of original essays exploring the reception of the Homeric Hymns and other early hexameter poems in the literature and scholarship of the first century BC and beyond. Although much work has been done on the Hymns over the past few decades, and despite their importance within the Western literary tradition, their influence on authors after the fourth century BC has so far received relatively little attention and there remains much to explore, particularly in the area of their reception in later Greco-Roman literature and art. This volume aims to address this gap in scholarship by discussing a variety of Latin and Greek texts and authors across the late Hellenistic, Imperial, and Late Antique periods, including studies of major Latin authors, such as Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, and Byzantine authors writing in classicizing verse. While much of the book deals with classical reception of the Hymns, including looking beyond the textual realm to their influence on art, the editors and contributors have extended its scope to include discussion of Italian literature of the fifteenth century, German scholarship of the nineteenth century, and the English Romantic poets, demonstrating the enduring legacy of the
Entangled Hagiographies of the Religious Other
Language: en
Pages: 245
Authors: Nikolas Jaspert, Alexandra Cuffel
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-04-23 - Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Tales of “saints”, whether told by their adherents or detractors, frequently featured the holy person’s dealings with members of other religions or cultures, or the stories themselves were appropriated by different religious or cultural groups. As such narratives moved from one social, cultural, religious or chronological milieu to another, the representation and meaning of the given holy person and the manner of his/her dealing with the religious other also often changed. As basic storylines remained recognizable, the transformations of specific details often provide important clues about shifts in attitudes over time and between communities. This volume provides a varied array of case studies of this process, ranging from early China to various Christian, Muslim and Jewish cultural contexts in the late antique, medieval and early modern periods.
Hetärengespräche
Language: en
Pages: 77
Authors: Lucianus (Samosatensis)
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1983 - Publisher:
Books about Hetärengespräche
Greek Literature in the Roman Empire
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Jason König
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-10 - Publisher: A&C Black
In this book Jason Konig offers for the first time an accessible yet comprehensive account of the multi-faceted Greek literature of the Roman Empire, focusing especially on the first three centuries AD. He covers in turn the Greek novels of this period, the satirical writing of Lucian, rhetoric, philosophy, scientific and miscellanistic writing, geography and history, biography and poetry, providing a vivid introduction to key texts, with extensive quotation in translation. The challenges and pleasures these texts offer to their readers have come to be newly appreciated in the classical scholarship of the last two or three decades. In addition there has been renewed interest in the role played by novelistic and rhetorical writing in the Greek culture of the Roman Empire more broadly, and in the many different ways in which these texts respond to the world around them. This volume offers a broad introduction to those exciting developments.
Selected Dialogues
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Lucian,, C. D. N. Costa
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-08-27 - Publisher: Oxford University Press
The Greek satirist Lucian was a brilliantly entertaining writer who invented the comic dialogue as a vehicle for satiric comment. This lively new translation is both accurate and idiomatic, and the introduction highlights Lucian's importance in his own and later times.
Enchantment and Dis-enchantment in Shakespeare and Early Modern Drama
Language: en
Pages: 194
Authors: Nandini Das, Nick Davis
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-12-08 - Publisher: Taylor & Francis
This volume addresses dealings with the wondrous, magical, holy, sacred, sainted, numinous, uncanny, auratic, and sacral in the plays of Shakespeare and contemporaries, produced in an era often associated with the irresistible rise of a thinned-out secular rationalism. By starting from the literary text and looking outwards to social, cultural, and historical aspects, it comes to grips with the instabilities of ‘enchanted’ and ‘disenchanted’ practices of thinking and knowledge-making in the early modern period. If what marvelously stands apart from conceptions of the world’s ordinary functioning might be said to be ‘enchanted’, is the enchantedness weakened, empowered, or modally altered by its translation to theatre? We have a received historical narrative of disenchantment as a large-scale early modern cultural process, inexorable in character, consisting of the substitution of a rationally understood and controllable world for one containing substantial areas of mystery. Early modern cultural change, however, involves transpositions, recreations, or fresh inventions of the enchanted, and not only its replacement in diminished or denatured form. This collection is centrally concerned with what happens in theatre, as a medium which can give power to experiences of wonder as well as circumscribe and curtail them, addressing plays written for the popular stage