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Entertainment In Early Milwaukee

Milwaukee
Author: Larry Widen
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738550992
Size: 55.22 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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What did early Milwaukeeans do to have fun and relax? This book answers that question, covering pop culture from the mid-1800s up to 1950, from the earliest tavern stages hosting traditional German plays and musicals, to the large traveling circus acts that arrived via the railroad, to the beer gardens, nickelodeons, and old grand cinemas that dominated the city's landscape during the first half of the 20th century. In its heyday, Milwaukee had several classic amusement parks with roller coasters, fun houses, water rides, and more. The first movie was shown in Milwaukee in 1896, and by 1920, there were nearly 100 buildings dedicated to motion pictures. And it was two Milwaukee businessmen who discovered the great Charlie Chaplin and also produced the 1915 epic Birth of a Nation.
Entertainment in Early Milwaukee
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Larry Widen
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
What did early Milwaukeeans do to have fun and relax? This book answers that question, covering pop culture from the mid-1800s up to 1950, from the earliest tavern stages hosting traditional German plays and musicals, to the large traveling circus acts that arrived via the railroad, to the beer gardens, nickelodeons, and old grand cinemas that dominated the city's landscape during the first half of the 20th century. In its heyday, Milwaukee had several classic amusement parks with roller coasters, fun houses, water rides, and more. The first movie was shown in Milwaukee in 1896, and by 1920, there were nearly 100 buildings dedicated to motion pictures. And it was two Milwaukee businessmen who discovered the great Charlie Chaplin and also produced the 1915 epic Birth of a Nation.
The Milwaukee Road
Language: en
Pages: 160
Authors: Tom Murray
Categories: Transportation
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-10-29 - Publisher: Motorbooks International
The true grit and glory days of one of America's greatest railroads come to dramatic life in this full-scale illustrated history by industry veteran Tom Murray. Words and pictures carry readers across the vast tracts of land and time traversed by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific-better known to history as the Milwaukee Road. Ranging from the railroad's late-nineteenth-century beginnings to its purchase by onetime rival Soo Line in 1985, the book looks at The Milwaukee Road's famed streamlined Hiawatha passenger trains, the "Little Joe" electric locomotives, and the sprawling fabrication and repair facilities in its namesake city. Whether surveying the railroad's routes and the trains that plied them, and the people who worked behind the scenes, or focusing on the line's motive power, rolling stock, passenger and freight operations, The Milwaukee Road provides a broad-scale, brilliantly detailed portrait of a great railroad, an industry, and a bygone era.
Office of the Sheriff, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
Language: en
Pages: 160
Authors: Tom Murray
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000 - Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
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Milwaukee's Bronzeville, 1900-1950
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Paul H. Geenen
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
With the migration of African American sharecroppers to northern cities in the first half of the 20th century, the African American population of Milwaukee grew from fewer than 1,000 in 1900 to nearly 22,000 by 1950. Most settled around a 12-block area along Walnut Street that came to be known as Milwaukee's Bronzeville, a thriving residential, business, and entertainment community. Barbershops, restaurants, drugstores, and funeral homes were started with a little money saved from overtime pay at factory jobs or extra domestic work taken on by the women. Exotic nightclubs, taverns, and restaurants attracted a racially mixed clientele, and daytime social clubs sponsored "matinees" that were dress-up events featuring local bands catering to neighborhood residents. Bronzeville is remembered by African American elders as a good place to grow up--times were hard, but the community was tight.
Vintage Milwaukee Postcards
Language: en
Pages: 162
Authors: Larry Widen
Categories: Collectibles
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005 - Publisher: Lulu.com
Nearly 250 vintage Milwaukee postcard views from the early 20th century are reproduced in black-and-white to illustrate this book. See the former theaters, restaurants, hotels, churches and public buildings that once graced the streets of this midwestern metropolis. Each postcard is captioned with information about the past or present building on the site. This book is fun for collectors, historians and photography buffs alike. This book is also available in an upscaled all-color version.
Milwaukee Police Department
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Maralyn A. Wellauer-Lenius
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
The Milwaukee Police Department was organized in 1855 with a determined chief, seven pugnacious officers, and little money. The department grew to 21 men by the start of the Civil War in 1861. Law enforcement in the city soon earned the national reputation for honesty, integrity, and fairness it has enjoyed into the 21st century. The Milwaukee Police Department was first in the country to establish a formal officer training school, police bomb disposal vehicle, and "talking squad car." Nefarious criminals handled by the department include the foiled presidential assassin John Schrank, the serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer, and characters with quaint nicknames like "Cat-eye Lil" and "Kelly the Choker."
Swiss in Greater Milwaukee
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Maralyn A. Wellauer-Lenius
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
A few men and women, mostly from German-speaking cantons, pioneered this remarkable Swiss community in the mid-1830s. Thousands who followed in their footsteps participated actively in the development of a vibrant new city, branding it with a unique style of efficiency and progressivism. The immigrants and their progeny prospered and distinguished themselves in various fields of science, commerce, art, and industry. They helped launch Charlie Chaplin's career, produced coumarin used in flavorings and perfumes, wrote a popular guide for 19th-century immigrants, and helped shape the nation's banking industry. Among their finest were Milwaukee's first archbishop, a world-renowned surgeon, an elected governor, an influential radical "free-thinker," a kindergarten pioneer, a wine grower, a successful whiskey distiller, and a prolific architect.
Milwaukee health care spending compared to other metropolitan areas geographic variation in spending for enrollees in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Maralyn A. Wellauer-Lenius
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher: DIANE Publishing
Books about Milwaukee health care spending compared to other metropolitan areas geographic variation in spending for enrollees in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.
Milwaukee's Early Architecture
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Megan E. Daniels
Categories: Architecture
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
Initially dominated by simple renditions of East Coast architecture, Milwaukee developed from three pioneer settlements, those of Solomon Juneau, Byron Kilbourn, and George Walker--three hubs from which three villages radiated outward into one city. Following the Civil War, Milwaukee's growth at the onset of the Industrial Era afforded the city a fanciful array of Victorian streetscapes. The 1890s followed with an era of ethnic architecture in which bold interpretations of German Renaissance Revival and Baroque designs paid homage to Milwaukee's overwhelming German population. At the turn of the century, Milwaukee's proximity to Chicago influenced the streetscape with classicized civic structures and skyscrapers designed by Chicago architects. World War I and the ensuing anti-German sentiment, as well as Prohibition, inevitably had adverse effects on "Brew City." By the 1920s, Milwaukee's architecture had assimilated to the national aesthetic, suburban development was on the rise, and architectural growth would soon be stunted by the Great Depression.
Educating Milwaukee
Language: en
Pages: 287
Authors: James K. Nelsen
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-11-17 - Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
"Milwaukee's story is unique in that its struggle for integration and quality education has been so closely tied to [school] choice." --from the Introduction "Educating Milwaukee: How One City's History of Segregation and Struggle Shaped Its Schools" traces the origins of the modern school choice movement, which is growing in strength throughout the United States. Author James K. Nelsen follows Milwaukee's tumultuous education history through three eras--"no choice," "forced choice," and "school choice." Nelsen details the whole story of Milwaukee's choice movement through to modern times when Milwaukee families have more schooling options than ever--charter schools, open enrollment, state-funded vouchers, neighborhood schools--and yet Milwaukee's impoverished African American students still struggle to succeed and stay in school. "Educating Milwaukee" chronicles how competing visions of equity and excellence have played out in one city's schools in the modern era, offering both a cautionary tale and a "choice" example.