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Putting Science And Engineering At The Heart Of Government Policy

Putting Science And Engineering At The Heart Of Government Policy
Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills Committee
Publisher: The Stationery Office
ISBN: 9780215540218
Size: 34.40 MB
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A report that considers the broad issue of why science and engineering are important and why they should be at the heart of Government policy. It also considers three more specific issues: the debate on strategic priorities; the principles that inform science funding decisions; and, the scrutiny of science and engineering across Government.
Putting science and engineering at the heart of government policy
Language: en
Pages: 297
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills Committee
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-07-23 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
A report that considers the broad issue of why science and engineering are important and why they should be at the heart of Government policy. It also considers three more specific issues: the debate on strategic priorities; the principles that inform science funding decisions; and, the scrutiny of science and engineering across Government.
The Work of the Committee In 2008-09
Language: en
Pages: 102
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills Committee
Categories: Science and state
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
work of the Committee In 2008-09 : First report of session 2009-10, report, together with formal minutes, and written Evidence
Putting science and engineering at the heart of government policy
Language: en
Pages: 81
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills Committee, House of Commons
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-07-23 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
This report considers a broad issue-why science and engineering are important and why they should be at the heart of Government policy-and three more specific issues-the debate on strategic priorities, the principles that inform science funding decisions and the scrutiny of science and engineering across Government. It revisits recommendations made in "Engineering: turning ideas into reality" (4th report session 2008-09, HC 50-I, ISBN 9780215529268). The Committee reiterates its call for the Government to move the Government Chief Scientific Adviser and his Government Office for Science into the heart of Government, the Cabinet Office. It also urges the Government to safeguard the independence of all Science Advisory Committees and make a number of recommendations on how this might be achieved. For example, transparency could be improved and setting up a press office in GO-Science would give SACs an independent voice. The principles that govern UK science funding decisions are discussed, and the report advocates a principle that can accommodate regional science policy, the full range of research funding streams, mission driven research, and the rationalisation of detailed and strategic funding decisions. Finally, the report welcomes changes to the Government's internal science scrutiny programme, and the House of Commons' decision to reinstate
Putting Science and Engineering at the Heart of Government Policy
Language: en
Pages: 27
Authors: Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Select Committee on Science and Technology, Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee
Categories: Great Britain
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-10-26 - Publisher:
Government response to HC 168-I (ISBN 9780215540348)
HC 703 - Government Horizon Scanning
Language: en
Pages: 47
Authors: House of Commons - Science and Technology Committee, Andrew Miller
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-05-04 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
The Government launched its new horizon scanning programme last July, stating that 'in a tight economic climate, it is more important than ever to have the best possible understanding of the world around us, and how that world is changing'. However, as it stands, the new programme is little more than an echo chamber for Government views. The new bodies that have been created consist entirely of Civil Servants, effectively excluding the vast pool of expertise that exists outside of government. The new programme does not even have a dedicated web presence to keep interested parties informed. The programme's failings are partially attributed to a lack of ministerial oversight. The Government also needs to recognise the potential role to be played in the new programme by the Government Office for Science (GO-Science), specifically the Foresight Unit. The relative lack of impact that the Foresight Unit has historically had on policy is largely a result of its non-central location in government. GO-Science is located in the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). In contrast, the new horizon scanning programme is located in the Cabinet Office. In choosing to situate the new horizon scanning programme in the Cabinet Office, the Government
Educating Tomorrow's Engineers
Language: en
Pages: 139
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-02-08 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
In the UK we teach young people to become computer users and consumers rather than programmers and software engineers. This is creating a chronic skills gap in ICT. We need around 82,000 engineers and technicians just to deal with retirements up to 2016 and 830,000 SET professionals by 2020. On the plus side, the Government's proposal to include computer science as a fourth science option to count towards the EBac is welcomed. The Committee also welcomes the EBac's focus on attainment of mathematics and science GCSEs but is concerned that subjects such as Design and Technology (D&T) might be marginalised. A Technical Baccalaureate (TechBac) is being designed but if it is to be a success, schools should be incentivised to focus on the TechBac by making it equivalent to the EBac. Reforms to vocational education following the Wolf Review meant that Level 2 of the Engineering Diploma, a qualification highly regarded, would count as equivalent to one GCSE despite requiring curriculum time and effort equivalent to several GCSEs. The Engineering Diploma, however, is currently being redesigned as four separate qualifications. The Committee also expressed concerns over the Department for Education's (DfE) lack of clarity on its research budget, and use
The Legacy Report
Language: en
Pages: 53
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Select Committee on Science and Technology
Categories: Science and state
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-03-31 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
Following a two-year absence the Science and Technology Committee was re-formed in October 2009 to conduct cross-departmental scrutiny of science and technology. This report summarises the Committee's work of this session. It also reviews the historical landscape of science scrutiny in Parliament across the work of predecessor committees, and documents the impacts they have had on policy and the culture of scientific debate within Westminster. The Committee highlight several inquiries and reports that have had significant impact in informing legislative decisions and holding government to the standard of evidence based policy making.
The Disclosure of Climate Data from the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia
Language: en
Pages: 59
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-03-31 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
In this report on the disclosure of climate data from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia, the Science and Technology Committee calls for the climate science community to become more transparent by publishing raw data and detailed methodologies. On the accusations relating to Professor Phil Jones's refusal to share raw data and computer codes, the Committee finds there was no systematic attempt to mislead and considers that his actions were in line with common practice in the climate science community, but those practices need to change. The Committee welcomes the appointment of the independent Climate Change E-mails Review led by Sir Muir Russell to investigate fully the allegations against CRU. The Committee has not looked at the science produced by CRU and it will be for the Scientific Appraisal Panel, announced by the University on 22 March, to determine whether the work of CRU has been soundly built. On the mishandling of Freedom of Information (FoI) requests, the Committee considers that much of the responsibility should lie with the University, not CRU. The leaked emails appear to show a culture of non-disclosure at CRU and instances where information may have been deleted to avoid disclosure,
Engineering in government
Language: en
Pages: 55
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-04-30 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
In March 2009, the predecessor Science and Technology Committee published the findings of its wide-ranging inquiry into engineering, "Engineering: turning ideas into reality" (HCP 50-I, session 2008-09, ISBN 9780215529268). The Committee examined four case studies: (i) nuclear engineering; (ii) plastic electronics engineering; (iii) geo-engineering; and (iv) engineering in Government. Through the case study on engineering in Government, the Committee made a number of recommendations to improve the Government's use of engineering advice and expertise in policy processes, which were supplemented further by the 2009 report "Putting Science and Engineering at the Heart of Government Policy" (HCP 168-I, session 2008-09, ISBN 9780215540348). In this report, the Committee states that Government and the engineering community have made progress in integrating engineering expertise and concerns into the formulation of policy. The formation of the Engineering the Future alliance as a coordinated voice for the professional engineering community and the ongoing efforts of the Government Chief Scientific Adviser in raising the profile of engineering advice are commended. The Government needs to ensure that engineering continues to have a high profile in policy, and particularly in policy development.
Scientific advice and evidence in emergencies
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee, Andrew Miller
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-03-02 - Publisher: The Stationery Office
In this report, the Science and Technology Committee examines how scientific advice and evidence is used in national emergencies, when the Government and scientific advisory system are put under great pressure to deal with atypical situations. The inquiry focused on four case studies: (i) the 2009-10 H1N1 influenza pandemic (swine flu); (ii) the April 2010 volcanic ash disruption; (iii) space weather; and (iv) cyber attacks. While science is used effectively to aid responses to emergencies, the detachment of the Government Chief Scientific Adviser (GCSA) from the National Risk Assessment (NRA) - the key process of risk evaluation carried out by the Cabinet Office - is a serious concern. The Committee recommends that the NRA should not be signed off until the GCSA is satisfied that all risks requiring scientific input and judgements have been properly considered. A new independent scientific advisory committee should be set up to advise the Cabinet on risk assessment and review the NRA. The Icelandic volcanic eruption in April 2010 is a stark example of the lack of scientific input in risk assessment: the risk of disruption to aviation caused by a natural disaster was dropped from the assessment process in 2009, despite warnings from earth