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The Rise Of The Russian Novel

The Rise Of The Russian Novel
Author: Freeborn Richard Freeborn
Publisher: CUP Archive
ISBN: 9780521085885
Size: 62.46 MB
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This introduction to the study of the Russian novel demonstrates how the form evolved from imitative beginnings to the point in the 1860s when it reached maturity and established itself as part of the European tradition. Professor Freeborn considers selected novels by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy. Extended introductory sections to the studies of Dostoyevsk and Tolstoy deal with their earlier works. A final chapter summarises the principal points of contrast between Crime and Punishment and War and Peace, and argues that in certain specific ways, they represent the peaks in the evolution of the form of the Russian novel. Quotations are translated, but key passages are also given in the original. Professor Freeborn treats the novel as a literary form and avoids the overworked formulae on which much historical writing on Russian literature has been based. He is concerned with the literary development of a great form.
The Rise of the Russian Novel
Language: en
Pages: 260
Authors: David Wayne Gasperetti
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998 - Publisher:
The first major study to place the genesis of the Russian tradition of novel writing in the eighteenth century, The Rise of the Russian Novel analyzes the prose fiction of the three most prominent writers of the time: Fedor Emin, Mikhail Chulkov, and Matvei Komarov. Currently subject to a remarkable renewal of interest among the Russian reading public, the novels of these three writers form the basis for Gasperetti's reassessment of Russia's early literary culture.
The Rise of the Russian Novel
Language: en
Pages: 289
Authors: Freeborn Richard Freeborn, Professor of Russian Literature Richard Freeborn, Richard Freeborn
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1973-01-04 - Publisher: CUP Archive
This introduction to the study of the Russian novel demonstrates how the form evolved from imitative beginnings to the point in the 1860s when it reached maturity and established itself as part of the European tradition. Professor Freeborn considers selected novels by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy. Extended introductory sections to the studies of Dostoyevsk and Tolstoy deal with their earlier works. A final chapter summarises the principal points of contrast between Crime and Punishment and War and Peace, and argues that in certain specific ways, they represent the peaks in the evolution of the form of the Russian novel. Quotations are translated, but key passages are also given in the original. Professor Freeborn treats the novel as a literary form and avoids the overworked formulae on which much historical writing on Russian literature has been based. He is concerned with the literary development of a great form.
Authenticity and Fiction in the Russian Literary Journey, 1790-1840
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Andreas Schonle, Andreas Schönle
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000 - Publisher: Harvard University Press
In illuminating analyses of major texts as well as lesser known but influential works, Andreas Schönle surveys the literary travelogue--a form marked by a fully developed narrator's voice, interpretive impressions, scenic descriptions, and extended narrative--from its emergence in Russia to the end of the Romantic era.
A History of Russian Literature from the Earliest Times to the Death of Dostoyevsky (1881)
Language: en
Pages: 388
Authors: Prince D. S. Mirsky
Categories: Russian literature
Type: BOOK - Published: 1927 - Publisher:
Books about A History of Russian Literature from the Earliest Times to the Death of Dostoyevsky (1881)
A History of Russian Literary Theory and Criticism
Language: en
Pages: 406
Authors: Evgeniĭ Aleksandrovich Dobrenko, Galin Tihanov
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011 - Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
This volume assembles the work of leading international scholars in a comprehensive history of Russian literary theory and criticism from 1917 to the post-Soviet age. By examining the dynamics of literary criticism and theory in three arenas—political, intellectual, and institutional—the authors capture the progression and structure of Russian literary criticism and its changing function and discourse. For the first time anywhere, this collection analyzes all of the important theorists and major critical movements during a tumultuous ideological period in Russian history, including developments in émigré literary theory and criticism. Winner of the 2012 Efim Etkind Prize for the best book on Russian culture, awarded by the European University at St. Petersburg, Russia.
The Image of Christ in Russian Literature
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: John Givens
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-05-29 - Publisher: Cornell University Press
Vladimir Nabokov complained about the number of Dostoevsky's characters "sinning their way to Jesus." In truth, Christ is an elusive figure not only in Dostoevsky's novels, but in Russian literature as a whole. The rise of the historical critical method of biblical criticism in the nineteenth century and the growth of secularism it stimulated made an earnest affirmation of Jesus in literature highly problematic. If they affirmed Jesus too directly, writers paradoxically risked diminishing him, either by deploying faith explanations that no longer persuade in an age of skepticism or by reducing Christ to a mere argument in an ideological dispute. The writers at the heart of this study understood that to reimage Christ for their age, they had to make him known through indirect, even negative ways, lest what they say about him be mistaken for cliché, doctrine, or naïve apologetics. The Christology of Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Mikhail Bulgakov, and Boris Pasternak is thus apophatic because they deploy negative formulations (saying what God is not) in their writings about Jesus. Professions of atheism in Dostoevsky and Tolstoy's non-divine Jesus are but separate negative paths toward truer discernment of Christ. This first study in English of the image of Christ
Noble Subjects
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: Bella Grigoryan
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-02-20 - Publisher: Cornell University Press
Relations between the Russian nobility and the state underwent a dynamic transformation during the roughly one hundred-year period encompassing the reign of Catherine II (1762–1796) and ending with the Great Reforms initiated by Alexander II. This period also saw the gradual appearance, by the early decades of the nineteenth century, of a novelistic tradition that depicted the Russian society of its day. In Noble Subjects, Bella Grigoryan examines the rise of the Russian novel in relation to the political, legal, and social definitions that accrued to the nobility as an estate, urging readers to rethink the cultural and political origins of the genre. By examining works by Novikov, Karamzin, Pushkin, Bulgarin, Gogol, Goncharov, Aksakov, and Tolstoy alongside a selection of extra-literary sources (including mainstream periodicals, farming treatises, and domestic and conduct manuals), Grigoryan establishes links between the rise of the Russian novel and a broad-ranging interest in the figure of the male landowner in Russian public discourse. Noble Subjects traces the routes by which the rhetorical construction of the male landowner as an imperial subject and citizen produced a contested site of political, socio-cultural, and affective investment in the Russian cultural imagination. This interdisciplinary study reveals how the Russian novel
The Rise of David Levinsky
Language: en
Pages: 529
Authors: Abraham Cahan
Categories: Assimilation (Sociology)
Type: BOOK - Published: 1917 - Publisher:
Books about The Rise of David Levinsky
Fiction's Overcoat
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Edith W. Clowes
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Cornell University Press
"During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Russian philosophy emerged in conversation with narrative fiction, radical journalism, and speculative theology, developing a distinct cultural discourse with its own claim to authority and truth. Leading Russian thinkers - Berdiaev, Losev, Rozanov, Shestov, and Solovyov - made philosophy the primary forum in which Russians debated metaphysical, aesthetic, and ethical questions as well as issues of individual and national identity. That debate was tragically truncated by the events of 1917 and the rise of the Soviet empire. Today, after seventy years of enforced silence, this particularly Russian philosophical culture has resurfaced. Fiction's Overcoat serves as a welcome guide to its complexities and nuances.".
Three Russian Tales of the Eighteenth Century
Language: en
Pages: 238
Authors: Mikhail Chulkov, Matvei Komarov, Nikolai Karamzin
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher: Northern Illinois University Press
In this collection, translator David Gasperetti presents three seminal tales that express the major literary, social, and philosophical concerns of late-18th-century Russia. These three works outline the beginnings of modern prose fiction in Russia and illuminate the literary culture that would give rise to the Golden Age of Russian letters.